Friday, October 31, 2008

Pomegranate Juice

This weekend I joined about 125 other runners in the San Francisco One Day 12/24 hr ultra run. The race is based on a 1.06 mile loop on the beach at Crissy Fields in San Francisco. I had signed up for the 24 hour option, but did not really know what to expect as this was my first time running this type of time-based ultra run on looped course. After the initial set up of gear and chair at the transition area - at 9 am the field was off! the course is essentially flat with 50/50 bike trail and gravel walk path. I noticed that even though the absence of hills to climb makes the running less strenuous - it also eliminates any natural walk breaks that one usually gets in a traditional trail ultra in the mountains.

I joined in with the lead group and we completed the first loop in just over 8 minutes. I continued a steady pace and picked up the lead for the first hour, and continued in the lead for the next 25 laps or so. After changing shoes and a short restroom break i dropped down to second place, and then to 4th. It was an enjoyable day with great weather and lots of people out walking and jogging along the beach. After running continuously for 3-4 hours I started taking a brief walk for 10-15 seconds on each lap to keep down the effort a little.

Having the transition area with the aid station every 1 mile makes for a very different race since then you come by an "aid station" every 10-15 minutes. This can make you loose ones rhythm and also complicate fluid and food intake as compared to a regular race where aid station only comes up every hour or so. At the aid station I tried some new fluids, including a new pomegranate juice, more on this later.

I kept up the pace and around 40 miles I started feeling need for more energy and fluids. I had not peed yet during the day which typically is a bad sign that ones fluid balance may be off. So during the next few laps I had some more fluids, only to find that it made me nauseous and I ended up throwing it up. This was alarming, and I had never experienced that in any previous race. I took down the pace a little bit, and tried to get my stomach to settle a bit.

My family came by and had brought some nice pasta to eat, and I walked the next couple of laps with my daughters while eating the food. It felt good initially, but it was clear my stomach was not there yet - and quite soon thereafter all the food I had eaten came back up. I felt ill for the next couple of hours and could not keep any fluids down. Later on I concluded it likely was the pomegranate juice that zapped my internals. The juice is relatively sour and also has some carbonation in it. It was a bad idea to try that on race day.

As the evening grew darker I got out my headlight and continued at a relatively slow pace around the course. I tried resting for 10 minutes to see if that would help, and I walked a few easy laps also. However, it seemed nothing I did really worked, so after a few more hours at around 8 pm I decided that this would be a 12 hour race for me, and not a 24 hour race. I had not had any fluids or nutrition for the last 6 hours, my legs and feet felt fine - but all my energy was gone. I concluded it would be a bad idea to try push on for another 12 hours during the night. So I finished a last 3 or so loops and then stepped off the course at just before 9 pm, still having completed a decent 65.1 miles in under 12 hours. In the process I also improved my PR for running 50K ( , and 50M and 12 hr (65.1 miles)

Even though I had not been able to complete the full race as intended it still was a great learning experience, and confidence boost since I felt great during the first 25 miles where I lead the race, and then contined in top 5 for another 30 miles - even if I actually was walking for the latter part of it.

Lessons learned for doing a looped 12 or 24 hr ultra run:
- have a specific running plan, with intended lap times and milestones, dont go too fast early on
- plan for when to stop at aid stations, for example only once in every 3-4 laps
- plan for when to eat, and take a real stop for 5-10 minutes
- walk some portions of the lap on regular basis to let body recover
- if your digestive system shuts down completely take a LONG rest, e.g., 30-60 minutes, before picking up the pace again

Monday, October 13, 2008

List of Persons - Well Known and Vegetarian

Vegetarian - Writers, Philosophers, Scientists

  • Alan Moore
  • Alan Watts
  • Albert Schweitzer
  • Alice Walker
  • Amanda Feilen
  • Benjamin Spock
  • Berke Breathed
  • Carla Lane
  • Chandrashekar Subrahmanyam
  • Charles Darwin
  • Charlotte Bronte
  • Clive Barker
  • Colin Spencer
  • Ed. Diana
  • Emanuel Swedenborg
  • FerriĆ©re
  • Franz Kafka
  • George Bernard Shaw
  • H.G. Wells
  • Henry David Thoreau
  • Henry Heimlich M.D.
  • Isaac Bashevis Singer
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • John Robbins
  • Krishnamurti Jiddu
  • Leonardo Da Vinci
  • Louisa May Alcott
  • Mark Twain
  • Milton
  • Nikola Tesla
  • Percy Shelley
  • Peter Singer
  • Plato
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Ruth Rendell
  • Scott Adams
  • Serge Raynaud de la Ferriere
  • Sir C. V. Raman
  • Sir Isaac Newton
  • Socrates
  • Srinivasa Ramanujan
  • Steven Jobs
  • Thomas Edison
  • Tolstoy
  • Upton Sinclair
  • William Blake
  • William Wordsworth
Historical Vegetarians & Advocates of Vegetarianism
  • Annie Besant
  • William Blake
  • General William Booth
  • Fenner Brockway
  • Charlotte Bronte
  • Rupert Brooke
  • Buddha
  • St John Chrysostom
  • Clement of Alexandria
  • Sir Stafford Cripps
  • Leonardo Da Vinci
  • Diogenes
  • Thomas Edison
  • Albert Einstein
  • Ralph Waldo Emmerson (American lecturer, essayist, and poet)
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Goldsmith
  • Dr John Harvey Kellog (brother of W K Kellog who founded the Kellog Company) (vegan)
  • Jiddu Krishnamurti (Spiritual teacher) Source: Krishnamurtis Notebook
  • Lamartine
  • Martin Luther
  • Mahavira
  • Eustace Miles
  • Milton
  • Montaigne
  • Barbara Moore
  • Sir Isaac Pitman
  • Origen
  • Ovid
  • Plato
  • Plotinus
  • Plutarch
  • Porphyry
  • Pythagorus
  • Sir C. V. Raman (Nobel prize-winning physicist - 1930s?)
  • Anthony Robbins (Success Motivational Coach) (vegan)
  • Richard St Barbe Baker
  • Henry Salt
  • Schopenhauer
  • Seneca
  • George Bernard Shaw (writer)
  • Shelley
  • Socrates
  • Chandrashekar Subrahmanyam (Nobel prize-winning astrophysicist - 1983)
  • Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772)
  • Nikola Tesla
  • Henry David Thoreau
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Voltaire
  • Dr Barnes Wallis
  • Mary Webb
  • John Wesle

Monday, April 14, 2008

More Mountaineering Quotes...

"The mountains have rules, they are harsh rules, but they are there, and if you keep to them you are safe. A mountain is not like men. A mountain is sincere. The weapons to conquer it exist inside you, inside your soul." - Walter Bonatti

"Pain is only weakness leaving the body." - Tom Muccia

"The summit is just a halfway point." - Ed Viesturs

"The next time you curse the fact that it's Monday, just think of it as proof that you made it through another weekend without killing yourself by doing something stupid." — Phil Garding

Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Great quote from famous health advocate and runner Are Waerland

"...Running acts as a bath in pure oxygen. It opens all the pores of our skin,
ventilates our clothes, stimulates our nerves, brings our capillary muscles into action,
oxygenates our blood, burns up all rubbish in our tissues and leaves us with a good
supply of oxygen in stock for further demands. This extra store of oxygen in the
human system manifests itself physically in a feeling of buoyancy and of almost
boundless energy. Worries disappear like a mist before the morning sun in June.
Difficulties seem to exist only to be overcome. Activity is our joy. Life is glorious ...
whilst oxygen-hunger makes us languid and lazy, we gasp for air and are mentally
irritable, taking a gloomy view of everything!..."

and another one

"What is old age but a gradual, involuntary and voluntary slowing down of all our
bodily activities. If you always walk gently, slowly, respectably, step by step, you will
be an old man at 30. But if you run at 60 and 70 and 80, at least once daily for 10 or
15 minutes, you will never know old age. You will keep young until the very last
moment of your life, and you will smile at death which should come to you then, not
as the result of a devastating pulmonary fire or pneumonia, but in the form Nature
meant it to come, the heart suddenly going to rest with its last beat like a clock when
the spring has run down. When the heart stops, everything on all the canals in the vast
lagoon-city of our body also comes suddenly to a standstill. Every boatman ships his
oars, every vessel hauls down its flag. The great Silence has fallen over the whole
community. The time has arrived for breaking up, for saying 'good bye' and starting
on a new adventure."